All posts by Sawdah Farooq

NHS data collection is changing

 

Please see the link below about new data collection

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/data-collections-and-data-sets/data-collections/general-practice-data-for-planning-and-research

If you want like to to opt out  for Type 1 data; Type 2 opt-out became the National Data Opt Out in 2019  then please check the link and register by 23rd June.

https://www.nhs.uk/your-nhs-data-matters/manage-your-choice/

Covid vaccines

COVID-19 vaccination – benefits outweigh risks

 

 

The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the World Health Organization have all reiterated that the benefits of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine in the prevention of COVID-19 far outweigh any possible risk of blood clots amongst those groups currently eligible to receive their first vaccination, as well as all of those due their 2nd dose.

Offering further reassurance, the EMA said that these extremely isolated cases “should be listed as very rare side effects”. 

In those aged 18-29, an alternative vaccine will be offered when the time is right for vaccinating this group, and GPs will ensure the appropriate vaccine is offered, and any questions are answered.  The UK’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has stated that this change in course has been made – not because there is a high risk to the under 30s from this vaccine, but due to them having taken an approach of the utmost caution – which should provide great reassurance, and is quite normal in the rollout of a global vaccination program.

 

More information can be found here:

COVID-19 vaccination and blood clotting – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Text copied on following pages.

 

 

 

COVID-19 vaccination and blood clotting

 

The UK vaccination programme has been very successful with more than 30 million people vaccinated and more than 6,000 lives already saved.

What is the concern?

Recently there have been reports of a very rare condition involving blood clots and unusual bleeding after vaccination. This is being carefully reviewed but the risk factors for this condition are not yet clear.

Although this condition remains extremely rare there appears to be a higher risk in people who have had the first dose of the AstraZeneca (AZ) vaccine. Around 4 people develop this condition for every million doses of AZ vaccine doses given.

This is seen slightly more often in younger people and tends to occur between 4 days and 2 weeks following vaccination.

Benefits and risks of the vaccination

Age Risk from COVID-19 Benefit of vaccination Risk of vaccination
Over 50 years of age or having underlying medical conditions Low – catching infection, passing on infection 1 dose – more than 80% reduction: deaths, hospitalisation, intensive care Uncommon – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
  Moderate – Long COVID 2 doses – more than 95% reduction: deaths Extremely rare – clotting problems
  Very high – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death    
30 to 49 years of age Low – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death 1 dose – between 60% and 70% reduction: catching infection, passing on infection Common – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
  Moderate – Long COVID 2 doses – more than 85% reduction: catching and passing on infection Extremely rare – clotting problems
  High – catching mild infection, passing on infection    
18 to 29 years of age Very low – hospitalisation, intensive care admission, death 1 dose – between 60% and 70% reduction: catching infection, passing on infection Very common – sore arm, feeling tired, headache, general aches, flu like symptoms
  Moderate – Long COVID 2 doses – more than 85% reduction: catching and passing on infection Extremely rare – clotting problems
  Very high – catching mild infection, passing on infection    

This condition can also occur naturally, and clotting problems are a common complication of COVID-19 infection. An increased risk has not yet been seen after other COVID-19 vaccines but is being carefully monitored.

What to look out for after vaccination

Although serious side effects are very rare, if you experience any of the following from around 4 days to 4 weeks after vaccination you should seek medical advice urgently:

  • a new, severe headache which is not helped by usual painkillers or is getting worse
  • a headache which seems worse when lying down or bending over
  • an unusual headache that may be accompanied by:
    • blurred vision, nausea and vomiting
    • difficulty with your speech
    • weakness, drowsiness or seizures
  • new, unexplained pinprick bruising or bleeding
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling or persistent abdominal pain

What you should do next

Over 50 years of age or with underlying medical conditions

All older adults (including health and social care workers over 50 years of age), care home residents, health and social care workers (includes unpaid carers and family members of those who are immunosuppressed) and adults with certain medical conditions were prioritised in the first phase of the programme because they were at high risk of the complications of COVID-19.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that you should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

If your first dose was with AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should have the second dose on time as you may still be at high risk of the complications of COVID-19. Having the second dose will give you higher and longer lasting protection.

If you are a healthy person over 30 to 50 years of age

The MHRA and the JCVI advises that all adults in this age group (including health and social care workers) should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines.

The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

If you are a healthy younger person aged 18 to 39

The MHRA and the JCVI advises that all adults in this age group (including health and social care workers) should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefits of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the first dose.

Currently JCVI has advised that it is preferable for people under 30 to have a vaccine other than AZ. If you choose to have another COVID-19 vaccine you may have to wait to be protected. You may wish to go ahead with the AZ vaccination after you have considered all the risks and benefits for you.

About the second dose

If you have already had a first dose of AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should complete the course. This includes people aged 18 to 29 years who are health and social care workers, unpaid carers and family members of those who are immunosuppressed. It is expected that the first dose of the vaccine will have given you some protection, particularly against severe disease.

Further information can be found at NHS.UK.

GP earnings

 

All GP practices are required to declare mean earnings (ie average pay) for GPs working to deliver NHS services to patients at each practice.

 

The average pay for GPs working in the practice of Covent Garden Medical Centre in the last financial year was £2,020 before tax and National Insurance.

 

This is for 3 part time GPs and 1 locum GP who worked in the practice for more than six months.

Survey-please fill in

NHS England mandates all surgeries to undertake virtual triage of patients as their first point of contact, to minimise the numbers of patients having to be physically brought into surgeries to be examined, and to operate NHS infection prevention control measures.  Contrary to media myths and coffee shop gossip, practices are not closed but to enable safe face to face appointments to take place when clinically needed, necessary entry restrictions at the front door and measures to control footfall and circulation within small spaces are necessary to ensure the safety of our patients and staff.

Please fill in this survey to improve our service- link below

Patient survey – Telephone and online appointments

 

7th september newsletter

Covid-19

Confirmed cases of Covid-19 are rising in all boroughs in NW London – protect your family, friends and neighbours.

  • In the past few weeks the number of confirmed coronavirus cases has gone up and has now become very concerning. We need to take action now to protect our loved ones and our community.
  • To address the rise in confirmed cases across the country, the Government has made gatherings of more than six people illegal from Monday 14 September 2020. The law change bans larger groups from meeting anywhere socially indoors or outdoors and is enforced through a £100 fine for anyone failing to comply.
  • You are most at risk when in busy crowds, confined spaces or close contact with others.
  • Therefore we all need to follow this new law, and take extra care, as how we behave is currently the only way to limit the spread of the virus.

 

You’re safest when you follow this advice:

 

  • Wash your hands frequently, with soap and water, for 20 seconds.
  • Remember to ‘social distance’ when in public areas – keep at least 2 metres away from people you don’t live with, if you can.
  • Wear a face covering on public transport, in shops and in supermarkets.
  • If you have any symptoms of coronavirus (a new continuous cough, a high temperature, or a loss of/change in taste or smell) please immediately self-isolate and book a free test online at nhs.uk/coronavirus or by calling 119.
  • Information and support is available for people who are recovering from covid-19, their families and carers. You can access information about recovering from Covid-19 at yourcovidrecovery.nhs.uk

 

Hands. Face. Space

Public Health England have launched a new campaign that urges the public to continue to wash their hands, cover their face and make space to control.

 

The aim is to control infection rates and avoid a second peak.

 

NHS 111 First

 

Due to rising attendances at London’s urgent and emergency care (UEC) sites and associated risk of infection; a new campaign is being launched across London to encourage people to use ‘NHS 111 First’.

 

This means:

  • People contacting 111 who are assessed as needing to attend an emergency department, will be booked a timeslot at their closest urgent and emergency care centre.

Key messages – NHS staff

  • Social distancing is still vital to beating Covid-19, and the risk of infection means we cannot have crowded EDs.
  • To address this, a series of initiatives have been devised to make it easier and safer for patients to get the right urgent care treatment at the right time and preventing a return to previous overcrowding in EDs.
  • We have increased capacity in 111 across London and have brought in more clinicians to assess patients.

Key messages – public

  • Use NHS 111 first, we’re here to help you
  • If you think you need to go to the emergency department (A&E), contact NHS 111 first before you go. We are asking you to call ahead to be given a time to arrive.
  • If you think you need us, call NHS 111 – a doctor, nurse, paramedic or trained advisor will answer your call and send you to the best place to be seen quickly and safely.
  • If the issue is serious or life threatening please do call 999 immediately.

 

Flu – Summary messages

 

  • There has never been a more important time to make sure you, and those you care for, are protected against serious illnesses such as the flu.
  • The flu vaccine is available for free to those most at risk.
  • If you are eligible for a free flu vaccination, your GP practice will contact you directly by letter or text to arrange it. Book your vaccination as soon as you are contacted.
  • Get the flu vaccination, stay well and protect the NHS.

 

Who is eligible to receive the free flu vaccine this year:

 

  • Pregnant women
  • Children aged 2- 11 years old
  • Member of a shielding household
  • 65+ years old
  • Frontline health and social care workers
  • Those with a long-term health condition (LTHC) such as:
    • a heart problem
    • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including bronchitis, emphysema or severe asthma
    • a kidney disease
    • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment (such as steroid medication or cancer treatment)
    • liver disease
    • had a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
    • diabetes
    • a neurological condition, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy
    • a learning disability
    • a problem with your spleen, e.g. sickle cell disease, or you have had your spleen removed
    • are seriously overweight (BMI of 40 and above)

 

Later in the year, the flu vaccine may be given to people aged 50 to 64. More information will be available later in the autumn.

 

Covid-19 Staying safe

 

  • Covid-19 is still in the community and the numbers of cases are rising across NW London. Please remain alert in order to safeguard yourself, your family and your community.
  • Wash your hands frequently, with soap and water, for 20 seconds.
  • Remember to ‘social distance’ when in public areas – keep at least 2 metres away from people you don’t live with, if you can.
  • Wear a face covering on public transport, in shops and in supermarkets.
  • If you have any symptoms of coronavirus (a new continuous cough, a high temperature, or a loss of/change in taste or smell) get tested. You can book a free test today.
  • Information and support is available for people who are recovering from covid-19, their families and carers. You can access information about recovering from Covid-19 here.

 

The NHS is open for business

(Ongoing campaign: new London-wide campaign now being planned on this, starting in September)

 

  • The NHS is still here for you and NHS premises are safe. If you are called for an appointment, please make sure you attend. We have put in place rigorous infection control measures to keep patients and staff safe.
  • Please contact your GP if you need medical advice.  You may be offered a telephone, video or online consultation in the first instance, as they are now all available across NW London practices.  We may ask you to send us pictures. If you are called in for a face to face consultation, please follow the guidance your practice will provide, so that your care is as safe as we can make it.
  • Talk before you walk. If you think you need to see a GP or hospital doctor, it is best if you call ahead – either phone your GP surgery or 111 – please use 111 online in the first instance as this will be quicker. In a medical emergency, call 999.
  • We have learnt a lot from these new ways of working and they will be a part of how you access your GP in the future. You can help us by supporting everyone in your family to use the technology.

 

Mental health

 

  • If you are stressed, anxious or experiencing low mood you can access wellbeing and psychological support from a North West London IAPT service. You can refer yourself or speak to your GP or another healthcare professional for a referral. For more information visit westlondon.nhs.uk/service/iapt/ or www.talkingtherapies.cnwl.nhs.uk/.

18.08.2020-latest updates

 

  • You should continue to act responsibly: follow the national guidance on social distancing, wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds and wear a face covering in public places.
  • The NHS is here for you: please seek help if you need it. If you need medical advice, please call us or dial 111 in the first instance or use  eConsult (please check her website). In a medical emergency, call 999.
  • If you experience a high temperature, a new, continuous cough or changes in your sense of smell or taste, you must book a covid-19 test immediately. You can book a free test today.
  • Information and support is available for people who are recovering from covid-19, their families and carers. You can access information about recovering from Covid-19 here.

Self-isolation prior to surgery: latest guidance

  • Patients who have an appointment for surgery at a hospital need to have a swab test for COVID19 a few days before their surgery and will need to follow self-isolation guidelines after this test, until they arrive at hospital for surgery.
  • Patients must complete the ‘coming into hospital’ checklist on the day of their surgery. The checklist is provided when the appointment is booked.
  • All patients attending hospitals need to follow guidance on wearing a face mask, social distancing and hand washing.
  • NHS premises are safe and this change in guidance will ensure more patients who need operations will be able to have them.
  • If you are called for an appointment, please make sure you attend. We have put in place rigorous infection control measures to keep patients and staff safe.

NHS open for business 

  • NHS premises are safe. If you are called for an face 2 face appointment following a telephone appointment , please make sure you attend. We have put in place rigorous infection control measures to keep patients and staff safe.
  • Please contact us if you need medical advice either through calling us on 02073797209 or using eConsult (please check her website). You may be offered a telephone, video or online consultation, as they are now all available across NW London practices.  We may ask you to send us pictures. If you are called in for a face to face consultation, please follow the guidance your practice will provide, so that your care is as safe as we can make it.
  • Talk before you walk. If you think you need to see a GP or hospital doctor, it is best if you call ahead – either phone or dial 111 – please use 111 online in the first instance as this will be quicker. In a medical emergency, call 999.
  • We have learnt a lot from these new ways of working and they will be a part of how you access your GP in the future. You can help us by supporting everyone in your family to use the technology.

Flu

  • Preparations for the annual flu season are well underway. All GP practices have ordered their flu vaccine and are planning how they will achieve the maximum take-up.
  • We have sufficient vaccine available in NW London so that all those eligible for the vaccine can receive it.
  • All GP practices are developing plans so that the flu jab can be delivered in a Covid-safe way.
  • The majority of patients will be asked to visit their own GP practice to receive their flu immunisation but some may be asked to go elsewhere.

 

 

Practice weekly newsletter 21.07.2020

  • NHS premises are safe. If you are called in for a face 2 face appointment following a telephone triage , please make sure you attend. We have put in place rigorous infection control measures to keep patients and staff safe. Please follow the guidance the practice will provide, so that your care is as safe as we can make it. This includes requesting patients to wear a face covering (unless you are exempt), using the sanitizers provided and attending alone.
  • Please continue to contact the GP if you need medical advice.  You may be offered a telephone, video or online consultation, as these are now all available across NW London practices.  We have learnt a lot from these new ways of working and they will be a part of how you access the GP in the future. You can help us by supporting everyone in your family to use the smartphone technology; for instance, the practice may ask you to send us a picture via your phone.
  • Covid-19 tests continue to be available for symptomatic patients. If you experience a high temperature, a new, continuous cough or changes in your sense of smell or taste, you must book a covid-19 test immediately.  Please follow the link to book a covid 19 test.  https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/testing-and-tracing/get-an-antigen-test-to-check-if-you-have-coronavirus/